News: Welcome to AudiRevolution.net
 
   Home   Help Login Register  
Pages: 1 [2]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: DIY- B7 RS4 Clutch (working)  (Read 17998 times)
littleredwagen
Newbie
*

Member Rating: 6
Offline Offline

Posts: 133


« Reply #25 on: December 16, 2014, 09:00:05 AM »

For Clutch slave and master I bought this tool http://www.summitracing.com/parts/psl-2003-b/overview/

It takes longer to prime the tool then to bleed the system. Gone is wasting time gravity bleeding etc, 5 minutes and done. I have done 3-4 slaves with this tool.

Jesus that's expensive for what it is!

Why not just buy a motive pressure bleeder? A lot more versatile imo. I've used the pressure bleeder several times to do entire master/slave swaps as well as brake line swaps. It's effortless with a pressure bleeder and again at half the price.

Similar to this:
http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B000Q6SL2W/ref=mp_s_a_1_2?qid=1418221824&sr=8-2&pi=AC_SY200_QL40

I have the motive as well. the difference in the two tools is that motive forces air down (traditional way) this one pushes air up so (natural way). The motive still doesn't get it as good as this tool does. I agree its expensive but it works so well. If you are only changing one clutch it is probably not worth it, but if you need to more than one, the time saving are there.
Logged
Maddog
Sr. Member
****

Member Rating: 46
Offline Offline

Posts: 1765



« Reply #26 on: December 17, 2014, 02:52:51 PM »

^I really don't understand what you're trying to say?

"The motive still doesn't get it as good as this tool does" <- What tool? The first one quoted from Summit?? How does one tool do a better job than the other at replacing the hydraulic fluids in a closed system? If you flush all the old out and have all new, I don't see a difference, other than twice the price.


Also don't get by what you mean it "pushes air up". I get that the motive is a pressurized chamber driving the fluid through the system, but I don't see the difference/understand how the first tool works or why one is better.

With the motive I just pressurized the system, then went to bleed the brakes/slave depending on what I was doing. The brake master / clutch master is doing exactly the same thing, pressurizing the system.


Just trying to understand what your saying incase I am truly missing something or how one operates better than the other.
Logged

Present: 996tt l Billet turbos l Aquamist HFS-3  l 60# injectors l Fabspeed catless exhaust l 997 GT3 Shifter
Past:      B7 S4 MT6 l JHM Stg 1
littleredwagen
Newbie
*

Member Rating: 6
Offline Offline

Posts: 133


« Reply #27 on: December 24, 2014, 07:30:46 AM »

^I really don't understand what you're trying to say?

"The motive still doesn't get it as good as this tool does" <- What tool? The first one quoted from Summit?? How does one tool do a better job than the other at replacing the hydraulic fluids in a closed system? If you flush all the old out and have all new, I don't see a difference, other than twice the price.


Also don't get by what you mean it "pushes air up". I get that the motive is a pressurized chamber driving the fluid through the system, but I don't see the difference/understand how the first tool works or why one is better.

With the motive I just pressurized the system, then went to bleed the brakes/slave depending on what I was doing. The brake master / clutch master is doing exactly the same thing, pressurizing the system.


Just trying to understand what your saying incase I am truly missing something or how one operates better than the other.

The tool I quoted pushes brake fluid in from the bleed screw not the res up top. so as you pump brake fluid in the air is displaced upwards towards the res. filling all the spaces air likes to get stuck. With a power bleeder like the motive forces brake fluid from the res. down, making it a little longer process to make sure you have removed all the air. Is my solution cheap? hell no. Is it hassle free and works on the first shot? you bet. Is it a required tool? again hell no. I bought it because I got tired with bleeding tapping, and gravity bleeding to evacuate all the air.
Logged
euroswagr
Sr. Member
****

Member Rating: 138
Offline Offline

Posts: 3620



« Reply #28 on: January 08, 2015, 06:49:41 PM »

*Updated Transmission Removal section, I still need to go get some pictures of the tools I used and a few other items but I should have time to put most of this together during the weekend.
Logged

"You don't even own an RS4..."
MDUBZ
Sr. Member
****

Member Rating: 42
Offline Offline

Posts: 1202


And why should I believe you?


« Reply #29 on: January 09, 2015, 11:53:56 AM »

I have the motive as well. the difference in the two tools is that motive forces air down (traditional way) this one pushes air up so (natural way). The motive still doesn't get it as good as this tool does. I agree its expensive but it works so well. If you are only changing one clutch it is probably not worth it, but if you need to more than one, the time saving are there.

Not trying to argue with you but I don't get this either. Obviously air bubbles in a glass of water will naturally rise to the top. But I'm not so sure that an air bubble in a brake caliper or line is going to naturally rise to the master cylinder.

Also, if you're pressurizing from the bleed nipple, where are you draining fluid from?

After installing my big brake kits I bled all 4 corners twice within 15 minutes with the Motive bleeder. I have a hard time believing it could have been done any faster with that bleeder.
Logged
Maddog
Sr. Member
****

Member Rating: 46
Offline Offline

Posts: 1765



« Reply #30 on: January 12, 2015, 02:15:34 PM »

^^Like I said, I literally see no way it is "easier". And really, it seems much more logical to me applying pressure through the master side rather than trying to push it through the nipple side. For twice the price, I still see very little if any beit. And even if it was the same price, I'd personally still be going with the motive b/c it seems easier as a one man operation.

For a slave bleed job, it seems like it'd be much more difficult to use this as a one man operation. I.e. would it not be tough to get it going from the bottom and then have to pop up top to see when all the air bubbles stop coming out, and then get back down below to stop it from pumping more fluid in?

And one other question, with the one listed on summit, what do you do with all the extra fluid you've put into the system from the nipple side that is now filling the reservoir? How do you keep the reservoir from overflowing?

Most the Vw/Audi tech buddies I have all use a snap on version of the motive pressure bleeder. I've just literally never personally seen a pressure bleeder from the nipple side like that used before.
Logged

Present: 996tt l Billet turbos l Aquamist HFS-3  l 60# injectors l Fabspeed catless exhaust l 997 GT3 Shifter
Past:      B7 S4 MT6 l JHM Stg 1
MDUBZ
Sr. Member
****

Member Rating: 42
Offline Offline

Posts: 1202


And why should I believe you?


« Reply #31 on: January 12, 2015, 02:52:11 PM »

And one other question, with the one listed on summit, what do you do with all the extra fluid you've put into the system from the nipple side that is now filling the reservoir? How do you keep the reservoir from overflowing?

This is what I'd like to know too.
Logged
littleredwagen
Newbie
*

Member Rating: 6
Offline Offline

Posts: 133


« Reply #32 on: January 29, 2015, 11:10:01 AM »

I have the motive as well. the difference in the two tools is that motive forces air down (traditional way) this one pushes air up so (natural way). The motive still doesn't get it as good as this tool does. I agree its expensive but it works so well. If you are only changing one clutch it is probably not worth it, but if you need to more than one, the time saving are there.

Not trying to argue with you but I don't get this either. Obviously air bubbles in a glass of water will naturally rise to the top. But I'm not so sure that an air bubble in a brake caliper or line is going to naturally rise to the master cylinder.

Also, if you're pressurizing from the bleed nipple, where are you draining fluid from?

After installing my big brake kits I bled all 4 corners twice within 15 minutes with the Motive bleeder. I have a hard time believing it could have been done any faster with that bleeder.

The fluid travels up to the res. It it fills up too much I use a turkey style baster to take some off the top. I do NOT use this tool to bleed my brakes at all. I use my motive for that. I only use this for the clutch master and or slave.

^^Like I said, I literally see no way it is "easier". And really, it seems much more logical to me applying pressure through the master side rather than trying to push it through the nipple side. For twice the price, I still see very little if any beit. And even if it was the same price, I'd personally still be going with the motive b/c it seems easier as a one man operation.

For a slave bleed job, it seems like it'd be much more difficult to use this as a one man operation. I.e. would it not be tough to get it going from the bottom and then have to pop up top to see when all the air bubbles stop coming out, and then get back down below to stop it from pumping more fluid in?

And one other question, with the one listed on summit, what do you do with all the extra fluid you've put into the system from the nipple side that is now filling the reservoir? How do you keep the reservoir from overflowing?

Most the Vw/Audi tech buddies I have all use a snap on version of the motive pressure bleeder. I've just literally never personally seen a pressure bleeder from the nipple side like that used before.

This is one man job, i've done it 3 or 4 times. Not only that but we have bled the system with the engine in the car from the top (on 01 A6 4.2, and a few of B5 S4s) I use either use a turkey baster or use the motive bleeder cap into a bottle. In reality if the system has been open the level is far enough down that I have never overfilled a res. The clutch feed line in the res. is far enough down that filling the system in the reverse direction does not yield over filling. When filling it once you see the bubbles stop coming out of the feed line you are done. I wish I was a doing a clutch job soon to film it.
Logged
Pages: 1 [2]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.14 | SMF © 2006-2011, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!